Due to Covid, all club meetings are currently online.  Watch the DGMG Homepage, Newsletter, and Facebook page for links to the monthly meetings.

Visitors Welcome!

Image by Pete Linforth from Pixabay
Meetings are generally held on the second Friday of each month (except in the summer) at Berthoud Hall, Room 108, 1516 Illinois Street Golden, CO 80401- VISITORS WELCOME!
Board Meeting is at 6:00 p.m. and
the General Meeting Starts at 7:00 p.m.

Berthoud Hall sits on the northwest corner of Illinois and 16th Street in Golden on the Colorado School of Mines Campus. Constructed during the Depression, its light-colored ceramic “stone,” ornate pillars and window moldings, and red tile roof set it apart from other campus buildings. Named for Edward L. Berthoud, a civil engineer, one of the founding fathers of the Colorado School of Mines, the building honors Berthoud’s lifetime involvement with the school’s organization, growth, and development. The geology department of CSM, including the rock and mineral labs, occupies the halls and rooms. DGMG meets in the far western end on the basement floor in Room 108 for the Board Meeting and General Meeting, Room 109 after the meeting for refreshments.

Where is the parking around Berthoud Hall? – Parking is available along Illinois St. and most CSM parking lots are free after 5 p.m. Please read and obey all posted signs.  For additional directions, downloadable map, parking information and a virtual campus tour, CLICK HERE.

Each month the club brings in speakers on a wide range of topics related to our hobby. Check this month's newsletter for details on the program for next meeting. See below for videos from some recent programs...

Photogrammetry and 3D Modeling for Paleontology

Shellie Luallin from the Western Interior Paleontological Society demonstrates the use of Agisoft Metashape photogrammetry software and Sketchfab  for use in Paleontology. She goes into detail about her techniques for producing 3D models of fossils, dig sites and geologic outcrops.

You can see Shellie’s work at:
https://sketchfab.com/Paleogirl https://coloradosprings.dmns.org/the-mammals/
https://www.coloradostratigraphy.org/strat-chart/cretaceous-chart 
https://www.cretaceousatlas.org/species/hoploscaphites-nicolletii/
  • Abstract
  • Links

Basic Introduction to 3D Mineral Photography and a tutorial on how take stereo pictures of tiny objects using focus stacking techniques. Professor Emeritus, Howard "Cork" Hayden, shows how to take stereo photos using an inexpensive Opti-Tekscope digital USB microscope with a custom modified mount. He goes on to give a tutorial on using Helicon Focus software to create images that are in perfect focus at every depth level. He then finishes with a tutorial on Stereo Photo Maker software that is used to perfectly align the left and right images and output them to either stereo pairs or anaglyph images which can be viewed with red/cyan 3D glasses. This video ends with a slide show of his beautiful anaglyph images. November 13th, 2020. 

Products/links mentioned in this video include:

3D Glasses - https://www.berezin.com/3d/

Opti-TekScope - https://opti-tekscope.com/

Lab Jack - https://www.amazon.com/Scissor-Stand

Stereo Photo Maker - http://stereo.jpn.org/eng/stphmkr/

Helicon Focus Lite - https://www.heliconsoft.com/

GEM VILLAGE

AFMS 1st Place Award Winning Program for 2017 by Beth Simmons, Ph.D.  Learn the history of America’s only Rockhound Colony.

See the original
Shipley’s Mineral House Booklet
(donated by Jim Dennis)

THE IRON FURNACE AT MARSHALL 1861-1870
 by Bill Reich and Beth Simmons. April 2020

The Iron Furnace at Marshall Colorado (near Boulder) produced 250 tons of iron, including the iron used to make the first (and only) cannon made in Denver (to ward off confederates). Where did the iron come from and how was it formed? Watch this video by Bill Reich and Beth Simmons to learn the story.

Tahosa Territory: A Colorado Front Range Family
By Beth Simmons PhD (2008)

Many families living in Colorado trace their roots back to when “Tahosa Territory” (“Land of the Mountain People”) was the name first proposed for the land now called “Colorado”. The Rutherford, Rash, Neville, Mosch, Lahnert, Bangerter, and Herald families harken back to when the South Platte River bottomlands, the Buckhorn valley west of Loveland, and the Upper Boulder Valley in Gilpin County were undeveloped land.

Focusing on the family’s myriad achievements, this 55-minute movie, “Tahosa Territory,” demonstrates the history of Colorado through the lives of the members of a family now named Mosch.

A short clip from the program presented by Brian Busse at the February 2013 DGMG meeting.

Want more?  Subscribe to the DGMG YouTube Channel

Page last updated 05/03/2021